Sexual Education is not Enough

Sexual Education is not Enough




We recognize the critical importance of healthcare, education, and sexual education for youth; however, we want to highlight that there are a multitude of matters, and often more urgent matters, that youth face. While sexual education may enable youth to make informed decisions with regard to their reproductive health, it is imperative that we invest the same energy and vigor in promoting education and vocational training that can give youth, especially from the developing world, the tools with which to fight poverty and unemployment.
Youth are the economic base and the future of every country. Consequently, the outcome document of the 45th session of the Commission on Population and Development should give balanced attention to the many pressing issues that face youth such as unemployment, underemployment and the ways in which we may utilize the tremendous human capital of youth for job creation and economic development.
As youth, we have a great need to contribute meaningfully in our societies. We are a vibrant force for social transformation and change, and we want to work to foster free and just societies. We believe that this should be emphasized at this Commission. Moreover, we advocate for policies that promote the family in society, and we object to calls for a separation between adolescents and the rights of their parents. 
As a youth delegate from Nairobi, Kenya, I want to see the Commission focus on more than sexual and reproductive health, and together with the members of the World Youth Alliance from around the world, I call the attention of the Commission to the many and diverse issues that are important to us as youth.
Hezbon
Age 26